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The Real Deal - A Young Working Cowboy In Today's World


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southplains

Where does a cowboy take shelter in a rough storm on the Plains? A slicker and hat will help a bit against the rain but what about lightning or hail?

Or sub-zero temperatures?

That's a good question for Dakota, Patina, if he ever gets out of the saddle again. :rolleyes: I'll let him know he has a question to answer.

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southplains

I'll relay a story about something that happened to him last week.

He decided he was going to use a four-wheeler rather than a horse one day, and the thing overheated and quit on him out in the middle of nowhere. He had to hike over miles and miles of rough terrain to get back--and he got lost! Ended up having to follow some cattle until he figured out where he was. I asked him if he told the other cowboys that he had gotten lost, and he said absolutely not. :rolleyes:

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Top Hand Cattle Co.

Where does a cowboy take shelter in a rough storm on the Plains? A slicker and hat will help a bit against the rain but what about lightning or hail?

As far as lightning goes, you just ignore it. Lots of hands have been killed by lightning. If you get caught out in a hail storm, shuck your saddle, throw your saddle blanket over your horses head (lots of horses won't stand for this, especially when hailed on but whatever) throw your saddle over your head and sit down and wait it out.

In the event of a tornado, see how fast your pony is.

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And ruin his image of Mister Tough Guy? No way, mom.

This kinda jump started a thought that I worked on today.

Cowboys (real, yearling smokin', bronc ridin', pasture doctorin', sure enough tougher than barbed-wire and boot leather cowpunchers) have very little. The pay grade for today's hands is pretty much what it was 30 years ago. All a cowboy can really be judged on is the horses he rides and his reputation. Mostly reputation.

There are lots of dangers in just every day run-of-the-mill stuff, like your horse falling on you cause you smoked a prarie dog hole while trying to cut off a bunch of yearlings. Or things go south while you're pulling one in the trailer. Or snakes, lightning, horse wrecks, cow wrecks, whatever.

Your reputation is in how you handle it.

Example: A group of yearlings break and run.

Hoss has two choices. Play it safe and check his horse up and let the yearlings get away, knowing he'll hear about it later, or yank his hat down, and let his horse hit 6th gear knowing full well there are prarie dog holes and all kinds of dangers looking to wreck him out. If Hoss values his reputation it's not even a thought. He just does it. Because he knows later on in the bunkhouse the conversation goes like this

Cowboy #1: Man did you see ol Hoss stretch out there and turn those sorry suckers?

Cowboy #2: Shoot ya bud, I sure did. He ain't scared is he?

Cowboy #1: Ol Hoss is a hand!

This a direct boost in reputation that you won't find in any other occupation. Every day is a chance to prove you're a better hand than the next guy. Because at the end of the day that's all you have. Reputation.

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This kinda jump started a thought that I worked on today.

Cowboys (real, yearling smokin', bronc ridin', pasture doctorin', sure enough tougher than barbed-wire and boot leather cowpunchers) have very little. The pay grade for today's hands is pretty much what it was 30 years ago. All a cowboy can really be judged on is the horses he rides and his reputation. Mostly reputation.

There are lots of dangers in just every day run-of-the-mill stuff, like your horse falling on you cause you smoked a prarie dog hole while trying to cut off a bunch of yearlings. Or things go south while you're pulling one in the trailer. Or snakes, lightning, horse wrecks, cow wrecks, whatever.

Your reputation is in how you handle it.

Example: A group of yearlings break and run.

Hoss has two choices. Play it safe and check his horse up and let the yearlings get away, knowing he'll hear about it later, or yank his hat down, and let his horse hit 6th gear knowing full well there are prarie dog holes and all kinds of dangers looking to wreck him out. If Hoss values his reputation it's not even a thought. He just does it. Because he knows later on in the bunkhouse the conversation goes like this

Cowboy #1: Man did you see ol Hoss stretch out there and turn those sorry suckers?

Cowboy #2: Shoot ya bud, I sure did. He ain't scared is he?

Cowboy #1: Ol Hoss is a hand!

This a direct boost in reputation that you won't find in any other occupation. Every day is a chance to prove you're a better hand than the next guy. Because at the end of the day that's all you have. Reputation.

I love that Bonanza is so ingrained into your psyche!

What we parents do to our kids!

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southplains

I love that Bonanza is so ingrained into your psyche!

What we parents do to our kids!

Poor thing has been subjected to it since he was a baby! :lol:

I've had some interesting discussions with Dakota about many aspects of Bonanza. Things like which of the Cartwrights were the best riders, and which of their horses were the best mounts. He definitely has opinions on things that went on in the show!

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Top Hand Cattle Co.

Kinda funny that I brought up wrecking out yesterday. Had to cut my way out of a pretty good wreck today lol

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Translation required here for those of who only speak English English: what is "wrecking out"?

Wrecking Out: The act of getting in a wreck. There are many different variations of wrecks but they usually involve a horse, a cow or a rope or a combination of all of these. Long story short, I had a tight rope between a horse and cow. Horse was losing the fight, I tried to bail out to mug the steer to help previously mentioned horse. Hung a stirrup, started dragging, steer ran up the rope to meet us, saddle started rolling so I went to cutting rope lol

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Someone get the smelling salts for Southplains!

Shoot she's watched me get run over by Bulls before. This is not a first time occurrence lol
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southplains

As long as she was only watching, and not pushing you under, you're probably okay.

There have been times when I may have been tempted! :rolleyes:;)

So, Dakota, did you slip free of the stirrup before you cut through the rope, or did you have to go ahead and cut through the rope? Which horse was it? Was he/she losing the fight because it was an extra big/feisty steer, or because the horse didn't have enough experience or muscle? Was anybody else there, or were you by yourself?

And most of all, I'm assuming everything--you, the horse, the saddle--came out okay??

(I hope you fanfiction writers are paying attention! :lol: )

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Well I buried my truck in the sand so now I have PLENTY of time to kill before somebody comes to pull me out. I was on Nathan's mare and she was doing her best but her and the steer probably matched weight. We drug him all the way up to the trailer but just couldn't make that last little jump in. I was by myself so I tried to bail off to run around and push the steer in and that's when I got hung up. The mare put slack in the rope which the steer took up and we were all about to end up in a bad way so I cut the rope.

I got another rope from the truck and stuck it on him and we hit the trailer at a run and I got him loaded. Besides a cut rope everything came out ok.

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southplains

Isn't that two cut ropes in four days? Does the ranch supply the ropes or are you responsible for your own?

So is this steer now loaded on the trailer being pulled by the stuck truck?

For everyone else: Nathan is one of Dakota's best buddies down here in Texas. His mare needs hours put on her (training) and Dakota needed another horse to add to his string, so they worked out a deal. Come winter, Nathan should be able to sell her at a higher price due to the fact that she'll be much more experienced after months of working cattle.

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